AIA retaliates in solidarity with Demilitarize McGill

Via Contra Info

“In the evening hours of March 24 2015, we slashed the tires of a McGill security division SUV and attacked the James Admin. building with flying chunks of concrete, vanishing quickly thereafter into the darkness of night.

We claim responsibility for this latest attack in retaliation to the University’s profiling, surveillance and harassment of students and activists affiliated with the group Demilitarize McGill.

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Demilitarizing McGill: Illustrated

Demilitarizing McGill: IllustratedWe’re thrilled to be releasing an info-graphic, Demilitarizing McGill: Illustrated, meant to be an accessible introduction to the campaign against military research on campus. If you want copies to distribute somewhere on or off campus, email us at demilitarizemcgill@riseup.net.

View a printable version here.

Blockade of James Administration

The James Administration Building was shut down by a group of around 30 people on the morning of March 24, 2015. Opponents of military research and austerity blocked access to the building starting at 7:45am and remained in place despite a heavy police presence on campus. The James Building contains the offices of the Vice-Principal, Research and the Office of Sponsored Research, which oversee military research contracts on campus. Many workers had gone home for the day by the time the group decided to end the blockade at 10:00am.

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See below for more photos and media coverage.

A flyer distributed to students and workers witnessing the action read as follows:

We are blockading the James Administration Building today as an act of resistance to McGill’s unending history of participation in colonial and imperialist projects. It follows that we also oppose McGill’s cooperation with the government in imposing austerity, which contributes to the militarization of the University while rendering the lives of students, workers and others more precarious.

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‘Non-criminal mischief’: the University’s file on Demilitarize McGill, 2013-2014

Students have obtained over 200 pages of documents held by the University concerning Demilitarize McGill activities between 2013 and late 2014. See them below (the first 84 pages are security reports, while the rest are mostly internal emails).

ATI – McGill’s File on Demilitarize McGill

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Shock Wave Physics researchers running front companies out of homes to dodge scrutiny of military contracts

Documents obtained through an access-to-information request and other records collected by Demilitarize McGill show that researchers in the Shock Wave Physics Group are involved in a scheme functioning to shield their weapons research from regulatory and public scrutiny. Professors David Frost, Samuel Goroshin and Andrew Higgins are using companies based at their home addresses to sign research contracts with the Canadian military. The research is conducted at McGill and employs McGill students and University resources. Entering into the agreements through the companies, ZND Inc. and Reactive Energetics Inc., allowed the professors to escape the requirement to disclose whether research funded by military agencies may have harmful consequences, before that provision was abolished by University Senate, and it is making it more difficult to find out the full extent of military research on campus.

Click here to read the full press release.

ATI – ZND/DRDC – Reactivity Study for Gasless System

What Dr Derek Ruths’ data says about him: Insights into surveillance and complicity at McGill


Take an interactive tour of Dr Ruths’ social networks.

On Thursday, December 11th, the Redpath Museum’s Cutting Edge lecture series is hosting McGill professor Derek Ruths to give a talk entitled “What our data says about us – Insights into human behavior from social media.”

Dr  Ruths would indeed be the person to tell you what your social media use says about you: he is actively involved in developing technology to surveil and control social networks – both the online kind and the  real-life networks they represent.

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Unpleasant end of semester at the Aerospace Mechatronics Lab

Via Anarchist News

804459906507978530“On the night of November 29, we snuck into the engineering department of McGill University and jammed the locks of the Aerospace Mechatronics Lab using superglue as a minimum gesture of solidarity with the survivors of the Israeli state’s summer attack on Gaza, in which 800 drone strikes took place over the course of a 50 day period.”

Read the full communique at http://anarchistnews.org/content/montreal-attack-drone-research-facility

Contract with Canadian government implicates McGill researcher in domestic surveillance efforts

Through an access-to-information request to the University, students have obtained the contract between McGill and Public Safety Canada, the arm of government responsible for the RCMP and CSIS, for ongoing research designed to support domestic surveillance and intelligence-gathering, through social media data mining and analysis.

Read the documents below.

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SSMU adopts mandate opposing military research

SSMU General Assembly, October 2014 (L-A Benoit / McGill Tribune)

SSMU General Assembly, October 2014 (L-A Benoit / McGill Tribune)

The Students’ Society of McGill University (SSMU) has adopted the Motion Regarding Support of a Campus Free from Harmful Military Technology Development, following online ratification of the decision of the October 22 General Assembly (GA) decision. The motion’s passage renews SSMU’s position opposing the development of harmful military technology on campus, and mandates the organization to support groups opposing military research, namely Demilitarize McGill.

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Whose remembrance?

Whose Remembrance? placards

Photo via www.flickr.com/photos/scottmontreal/

An informational action during McGill’s annual Remembrance Day ceremony centered on sharing facts about Canada’s role in warfare that tend to go unmentioned each Nov. 11. The text of each placard is reproduced below. Considering what the action consisted in, the enraged reactions from a number of people lend credibility to Demilitarize McGill’s basic claim about Remembrance Day, which is that it is an exercise in selective memory, organized to enforce the forgetting of any element of war that conflicts with the story the Canadian state wants to tell about itself.

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by Bliss Drive Review